Generous Orthodoxy  

A review of And God Spoke to Abraham in The Christian Century describes my work in exactly the terms that I hope and pray to achieve. Here is an excerpt from the review, by Jason Byassee, senior pastor of the United Methodist Church in Boone, NC:

Fleming Rutledge is the most interesting preacher today working the fault line between the mainline churches and evangelicalism. Throughout this remarkable collection of Old Testament sermons she calls for mainliners and evangelicals to realize their common identity in Christ for the sake of our mutual mission in the world. She chides both, loves both, belongs to both....

Rutledge has plenty of grief to pour out both on her fellow mainliners as we yawn in the presence of a holy God while our churches hunger for the word of the Lord, and on evangelicals, who fetishize the flag and rally to American bravado rather than biblical humility. But she judges in order to offer grace. If our divisions are a theological mistake, cannot God bring about their remedy?

The sermons' central theme [is that] we can speak of God only because God has first spoken to us. The trouble with the church in the United States is that we constantly turn that order around. Every sermon in this book stretches to remind us of the biblical order of things: God seeks us before we have any interest in or word to say about God....

Rutledge somehow manages to champion orthodoxy without anger and without adopting a scold's posture...

I especially hope that last sentence is true. It might come as a surprise to those who knew me when...